Livability during construction (from Kary, 928)

Hello WCP Neighbors,

We are in unit 928 and only in the early stages of the remodel.

So far, I have taken the advice of neighbors further along in the process, and tried to be as adaptive and flexible as possible. Again, we are only in the beginning phases …

And thus far, what I would recommend is when the deck resurfacing does happen in your cluster, find out the specific days. If sensitive to smells, you may want to sleep elsewhere for the night(s).

I would appreciate knowing, if possible, what tasks really do require you to be elsewhere and then knowing from
Bob, what date those specific tasks will happen. Again, I understand this may not always be possible but just knowing which tasks (like removal of tile in courtyard) are recommended for being away from your home would be helpful.

And like others have requested, an updated timeline would be helpful.

I also keep thinking about how wonderful our homes will be once remodel complete!!

Thanks to all involved in making the incredibly complex remodel happen!
Kary

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About hmarcuse

I've been an environmentalist since my college days in the 1970s (May 1977 Seabrook, New Hampshire occupation) , and am now a professor of German history at the University of California, Santa Barbara.
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One Response to Livability during construction (from Kary, 928)

  1. hmarcuse says:

    Response from Sarah Cline
    When a type of water proofing material is applied to the patio it smells strongly. I think it is the same product as went on the deck. The smell lasted about two days. Since the windows and doors are boarded up it is not as overwhelming as the deck smell was, but the furnace room retained the smell since it has just the bottom vent.

    By the way, until I pointed out to the construction crew that the furnace room by law had to have venting to the outdoors, they had no plans to temporarily install venting. They cut an opening at the bottom of the plywood and popped the old vent in, and presumably now this is standard.

    The 910s is an experiment in figuring out how to do things. Phil and Bob are owed a medal of honor, since their unit is the real testing ground. I’m glad that their windows and doors are now in, but I am aware that it took multiple tries to get them properly. My windows are in, but not my doors. Workmen were arguing at high volume about how to install them, perhaps not realizing that I was on the other side of the plywood. It will be awhile before the final finish work on the exterior walls are done, since all the windows and doors in my row have to be done. Then they redo the stucco around the opening. And the finish work on the interior is yet to be done, i.e., the trim around the windows and doors.

    Again, I’m hopeful that what they’ve learned here will be helpful to the rest of the complex. The new windows are much bigger than the existing ones, so when the project is done (when, when?) they will be much nicer.

    A further note on my two floods and the repair work: the paper and painters’ tape that was put down to protect my wood floors from workmen was left so long that when it was finally taken up, it also removed the finish on my floors. Servpro determined that there was no way to do spot repairs.

    For those that planned to stay at home during demolition: the jack hammering is VERY loud and sustained. I was glad to have my office to escape to. My two geriatric cats (ages 17 and 15) were pretty traumatized. One simply retreated under the bed covers for entire days, coming out only in the evening. Weekends are a blessing since there is no disruption from workmen. On the other hand, no progress toward completion is made on those days.

    An updated timeline from the contractors is a much desired piece of information. Perhaps they regretted sending out earlier ones since they bear little resemblance to reality. Still, there is progress on the ground.

    Sarah Cline
    914

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